POSTERS OF THE DAY: JESUS & KABBALAH

Rabbi Yehoshua ben Yoseph (Jesus the son of Joseph) was the Messiah ben Joseph sent to bring the energy and Light of the Torah to the entire pagan and gentile world. He taught Kabbalah to his closest students but to the general masses he spoke only in metaphor to keep it simple. He embraced the bandits, thieves and sinners, as did all Kabbalists in history. Like Rabbi Akiva, who was skinned alive then slaughtered for teaching Kabbalah to the Israelites, Jesus was executed for attempting to bring the Kabbalistic mysteries of Torah to the rest of the world.

This would have brought about the redemption of the world had he succeeded.

 

Billy Phillips

Billy Phillips has been a student of Kabbalist Rav Berg and Karen Berg since 1989. He has been instrumental in helping to make Kabbalah accessible for the masses working on both private and public projects under the guidance of Kabbalist Rav Berg. He has lectured on a variety of topics, most notably the profound connection between Kabbalah, Christianity, Islam and the world of Science.

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3 Responses

  1. Maye says:

    In my spiritual search I never doubted that Jesus was the mesiah, and I always found the similarities of Kabbalah and his teachings. Im so happy you exposed this subject. Thanks You!

  2. Rajel says:

    This is the time that nothing will remain hide in the spiritual devolop of conciencien and knowledge… All the time i knew he nevet tried to install a new religion, but to teach to all the people the truth about our Creator… Thnks a lot Billy…

  3. Reuven Yisroel says:

    The ARI explains that, although Moshiach ben Josef is slated to be killed by the wicked, this will not happen. The fact that the exile continues unabated means that Moshiach ben Josef is given the chance to be reincarnated in every generation, to challenge the wicked by bringing people back to God. Though he must die each time, he is not actually killed in battle. Rather, he is taken by God and spared death at the hands of the wicked. Indeed, Moshiach ben Josef’s “death” is really an allegory for his unsuccessful battle against evil. This is why he must return each time to pick up where he left off, until wickedness is finally overcome.

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